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‘War of the Words’ Might be Steven Spielberg’s Most Terrifying Film“: According to Erik Childress at Rotten Tomatoes.

The ill-fated ferry ride itself is a horrifying set-piece well beyond the nightmares of Sheriff Brody, ‘Jaws’’ heroic lawman, who also never had to decide whether to save his kids by killing Mayor Vaughn, whose crimes against humanity were far greater than just making too much noise, like Tim Robbins Harlan. The throwaway moment of a blood bank announcing that they ‘have more blood than we can use’ is alternately ominous and reassuring, but paired with the sight of an alien tripod harvesting a human being and spewing their blood across the landscape, it offers little comfort. There is nowhere to run, nowhere to hide.

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Out of Hiding: Group of Ethiopia’s Hidden Jews Find Aid and Support to Improve Their Lives and Practice Judaism“: An essential report from Keri Guten Cohen at The Jewish News.

Poverty is rampant among the Hidden Jews, Moges said, adding, ‘Most people live hand to mouth and use what little money they earn to buy food.’ He says they make about 90% of Ethiopia’s crafts — pottery, weaving, blacksmithing and metal work using ancient methods — and are known as the Bal Ej (crafts makers). In Ethiopia, these are seen as lowly professions. Because of superstition, no one will buy from them directly in the market, so a broker buys their wares and resells them.”

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‘Gone With the Wind’ Has Returned to HBO Max With Prologue About How Film ‘Denies the Horrors of Slavery’“: As reported by TVLine‘s Matt Webb Mitovich.

“[Jacqueline] Stewart notes how producer David O. Selznick assured the NAACP at the time that he was ‘sensitive to the feelings of minority peoples,’ yet proceeded to deliver a film that depicts a ‘world of grace and beauty, without acknowledging the brutalities of the system of chattel slavery upon which this world is based.’ Stewart says that ‘the treatment of this world through the lens of nostalgia denies the horrors of slavery as well its legacies of racial inequality.’

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